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Full text of "The Gatineau Valley among the Laurentians. A beautiful country opened to tourists"

May 15^'' 1898. 



THE 




IN 












E 


A 















H.J.BEEMER. P.W.RES5EMAN. 

Fres/c/ent. Genera/Sup^ 

Ottawa. NT. 



OTTAWA & GATINEAU RAILWAY 



TRAINS NORTH 

READ DOWN. 



X 5 



o 
X 

(U 



I P 2 
I I I 

>0 irO '-' 



TiriE TABLE 

May 15th, 1898. 



TRAINS SOUTH 

READ UP. 



Sorotfyjfurtef 
jmson 



I 1 



08 

48 



58 



Exp 



pm 

8.15 
8.10 

05 

7-57 
7-45 
7.24 

7. II 



6.56 
6.46 



O 
C 



Exp 

pm 
7.38 
7-33 
7.29 



7.23 
7. II 
6.56 



6.45 



6.30 
6.21 



6.3516.09 
6.23!5o9 



53 



6.17 
6.02 
5-50 
5.42 
5-33l5-o8 

5-204.55 
pm I pm 



5.18 



The EDITH and LORNE PIERCE 
COLLECTION of CANADIANA 




Queens University at Kingston 




AMONG THE LAURENTIANS. 

J\ Beautiful Country opened to Coun$t$ 

The most Lovely Spots for Picnics and Excursions 




50 those who seek a change of air and a summer resort, the 
purest and most invigorating atmosphere can be breathed 
at our very door. Summer residents are to be found in 
great numbers at Chelsea (Kingsmere), Kirk's Ferry, Cascades, 
Wakefield, and in the other villages. 



3 



OTTAWA & GATINEAU RAILWAY 



TRAINS NORTH 

READ DOWN. 



-Sunday only. 
-Saturday only. 


ily except Saturday 
id Sunday. 


ily except Sunday 


^ 3 
C 


Q 


1 1 


1 

CO 




6 6 
"A "A 


d 
'A 


6 
'A 


Exp. Exp 


Mxd 


Exp 


a.m. pm 


a.m. 


pm 


9.30 1.30 


8.00 


5.00 


9-35 1-38 


8.25 


5-07 


9.40 1.43 


8.29 


5-II 


9.45 1-48 


8.38 


5-15 


9.562.05 


9.00 


5-30 


10.08 2. 19 


9.17 


5-45 


10. 17 2.30 


9-33 


5.58 


10.38 2.46 


10.006.13 


10.47 2.54 


10. 12 6.22 



TRAINS SOUTH 

READ i;P. 



TIHE TABLE 



May 15th, 1898. 



2 

3-2 

5.2 
8.6 
12.3 

16 
21 

21.8 

25 



10.573-05 
11.073. 14 

11. 13 3.20 
II-303-35 
II. 41 3-47 
11.493-53 
11.594.04 

12. 14 4.20 
\ p.m. pm 



10.266.35 
10.376.47 
10.456.52 
1 1 . 08 7 . 06 
II .28 7. 17 
11.357.22 49. 

11.457.3153- 
1 2 . 00 7 . 45 60 
no'n pm 



STATIONS. 



C 

•i-> 
o 

X 
(U 

P 



5 



Exp Mx 



m pm 

Lv. Ottawa(i) .^^'9.00 7. 15 
.. Hull (2) .... 8.547.08 
Gatiueau Jun c . . 8 . 48 6 . 48 

. *Ironsides. ... '8.38 6.43 

. . Chelsea 8 . 26 6 . 30 

*Kirk's Ferry .. 8. II 6. II 

. .^Cascades .... ^8.02 5.58 

.*Rockhurst 

. . Wakefield .... 7 . 46 5 . 21 
North Wakefield . 7 . 35 5 . 00 



pm 

B.15. . 
8.107.33 
8.057.29 



. Farrellton . 
*Brennan's 
. . . Low . . . 
. . Venosta . . 
Kazubazua 
. ^Ayhvin. . 
*Mark's Crossing 
Z Gracefield (3) ^|6. 10 3.00 
j am pm 



7.254.46 

^54.33 
084.23 

544.05 
43 3-47 
343.32 
243.17 



Exp 



7.57 
7.45 
7.24 

7. II 



6.56 
6.46 



o 

03 
C 



o 
Exp 



pm 
7.38 



23 
II 
6.56 



6.45 



6.30 
6.21 



6.3516.09 
6.23I5.59 
6.i7i5.53 
' 025.38 
26 



5.50 
5.42 

5.33 
5.20 
pm 



5. 
5.18 
5-08 

4.55 
pm 



*Flag stations ; trains stop when signalled. 

CONNECTIONS. 



1 Canadian Pacific Railway ; Canada Atlantic and Ottawa, 
nprior & Parry Sound Railways ; New York & Ottawa Rd., 
d Ottawa River Steamboats. 

2 Hull Electric Railway ; Pontiac Pacific Junction Railway. 

3 Stage for Bouchette, Maniwaki and Blue Sea Lake. 



P. W. RESSEMAN, 

General Superintendent. 




AMONG THE LAURENTIANS. 

E Beautiful Country opened to tourists 

The most Lovely Spots for Picnics and Excursions 




50 those who seek a change of air and a summer resort, the 
purest and most invigorating atmosphere can be breathed 
at our very door. Summer residents are to be found in 
great numbers at Chelsea (Kingsmere), Kirk's Ferry, Cascades, 
Wakefield, and in the other villages. 



3 



/ 



f^kfi/^fiff This beautiful place of resort is visited every 
summer by a large number of tourists and 
summer residents. Its sporting grounds and 

beautiful groves have attracted attention far and wide. 

T^t-n ^cvmur*^^ Mountains and Lake, four miles from 
fc/l inffSTHGrG Chelsea, and as well as Chelsea draws 
every summer a number of residents and pleasure seekers. 

J^/rir^ K 3^i^rrJi ^^^^^^ splendidly situated, 

It l\ u ^✓c//^ audits approaches are very beautiful. 
Many summer residences have been built last year, making 
Kirk's Ferry one of the most popular resorts. 

^n/rr^/y c "^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ becoming a favorite Pic-nic point, 
UoCClClGo for everything in its lovely \acinity makes it 
such. 



L^/*/^/^ Which is the centre of a large trade in 
Li/ClfCOriGlCl forest products and general merchandise, 
and progressing rapidly, and is becoming an important and 
fashionable place of resort. 



Q7^^^L O/)^ L^A'^J^ This place is \ddely known for 
/(Ort/l U/a/Cerieia the great catches of Bass, Pick- 
erel, Pike and Trout, in the numerous lakes lying in its environs. 
Amateurs of the rod and line never miss to pay this place a 
visit when the season is opened. 



4 



Jarremon and Xow 3" JeTdi'nro? 

picnickers. There are always a large number of summer people 
at these places. At Low, we have the famous Paugan Falls, 
which without doubt is one of the prettiest waterfalls in Canada. 
There is also a very fine natural park. 

OJnnn ^//r ^iiother spot where the amateurs who like to 
G/iOoiCl p^gg ^ pleasant time in trout and pike fishing 
can delight themselves in that sort of sport in the numerous 
lakes which abound in its environs. 

Ti^rv '^i//%rw T'-itrw ^^^^ another brook trout fishing point. 
a^UOaZUa ^he Kazubazua Creek and Danf ord Lakes 
are a few miles from the well known Iroquois House, where 
sportsmen are sure to have good sport. 

^r'rwr*fi'fi^)r^ The tourist can see there " one of the great 
%J raUGilGia bi^ck and silent rivers of the north "—the 
Pickanock, where good fishing can be had, and from this point 
is reached the famous Blue Sea Lake and twenty other good 
fishing lakes, where bass, trout, pike and other fish may be 
caught in plenty. Also game of all kinds abounds in the near 
vicinity to this point. 



/ 



Rules and Regulations regarding Com- 
mutation and Season Ticket Rates. 



COMMUTATION AND SEASON TICKETS ARE FOR SALE ONLY AT T 
ROOM 31, CENTRAL CHAMBERS, OTTAWA. 



COMMUTATION TRIP TICKETS. 

OMMUTATION trip tickets will be good for three months 
from date of sale. Ten trip tickets wnll be issued to pur- 
chaser " and family." Such tickets will be accepted for 
the passage onl\' of the person named thereon, any member 
of his (or her) family, also servants living permanently in his 
(or her) house, and any of his (or her) guests; but this privi- 
lege will not permit holder to sell or transfer any of the trips for 
which the ticket may be good, such sale or transfer being unlaw- 
ful. 

The term " guest " is to be construed as meaning a person 
who does not reside permanently in the same city, town or 
village as the ticketholder, but is residing temporarily in the 
house of the purchaser of the ticket (whose name is written 
thereon). 

Twenty-six and fifty-two trip tickets be sold to indi- 

viduals and to families. When sold to families, these tickets 
will be good for six persons only, members of one family who 
live in the same house ; permanent female domestic servants 
included as members of the family. The name of each person 
for whom the ticket is good will be shown on ticket. If pur- 
chaser desires ticket to include female servants, the names 
must be shown, thus : " Jane Simpson, ser\^ant." 

Ten, twenty-six and fifty-two trip tickets will be sold to 
business firms, and made good for not more than three members 
of a firm, including the book-keeper as one member, and in each 
case specifj'ing the names on the ticket. 

Conductors will punch one number for each one-way trip 
for each passenger, one child travelling alone, or two children 
(under twelve and over five) travelling together to be con- 
sidered the same as one adult. 

CHEAP SATURDAY AND SUNDAY EXCURSION TICKETS 

are on sale at 
Ottawa & Hull 
Stations, from 
May 15 to Oct. ' 
17, inclusive, to 
all points men- 
tioned in this 
folder, at One 
Single ist Class 
Fare, good go- 
ing on Saturda}' 
and Sunday on 
which sold, and 
returning on 
Monday morn- 
ing following 
on train No. 2. 



Club Sportsmen Tickets on sale only at 31 Central Chambers, 
to bona-fide members only, on prese'ntation of membership card 





6 



«Onawd and 0atineau Railway* 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

TICKET OFFICES at all important Stations are open 20 
minutes before the departure of passenger trains, and pas- 
sengers are respectfully requested to purchase tickets before 
taking seats in the cars. Ten cents additional will be 
charged for a ticket purchased on the train, and such tickets 
will not be issued to any point beyond the run of the con- 
ductor to whom the fare is paid. 

TICKETS can be obtained at Canadian Pacific Railway offices 
and stations in Quebec, Montreal and Ottawa. 

LOST TICKETS — Railway Companies are not responsible for 
lost tickets ; therefore, all possible precaution should be 
taken to prevent their loss. Upon purchasing through 
tickets, passengers should make a memorandum of the 
' ' destination, ' ' ' 'by what Railway issued, ' ' ' 'form number, ' ' 
"consecutive number," and "place and date of sale." 
They should make a memorandum also of the consecutive 
numbers of their baggage checks. This will aid in their 
recovery if lost or stolen. 




PERSONAL BAQGAQE not exceeding 150 lbs. in weight will 
be checked to and from all stations of the Ottawa and Gati- 
neau Railway upon presentation of one full passage ticket ; 
75 lbs. on half ticket. All baggage should be addressed. 
Personal baggage in excess of 150 lbs. will be charged for 
in accordance with tariff furnished agents, but no piece of 
baggage weighing more than 250 lbs. will be received. 
Passengers paying for excess baggage will receive an 
" Excess Baggage " ticket, which must be delivered to the 
agent with the checks when the baggage is claimed. 
CHILDREN under five years of age, when accompanied, will 
be carried free. Children between the ages of five and 
twelve years will be carried at half the adult rate. All 
over twelve years of age must in all cases pay adult rates. 
In the event of any disagreement with a conductor, rela- 
tive to tickets required, privileges allowed, etc., passengers 
should pay the conductor's claim, take his receipt, and refer 
i the case to the General Passenger Agent for adjustment. The 
I conductor has no discretionary power in such matters, but is 
{ governed by rules which he is not authorized to change. 
I For Men or Merchandise going to timber limits of the 
Gatineau or Ottawa rivers, thisistheShortestandQuickest route. 

fi^^For further information apply at O. & G. Railway 
Office, 31 Central Chambers, Ottawa, Ont. 

7 



CLOSE SEASON FOR FISH. 

Bass shall not be caught, sold or had in possession from 15th 

April to 15th June. 
Maskinonge do do from 25th May to ist July 

Pickerel (Dore) do do from 15th April to 15th May 
Speckled Trout do do from ist Oct. to 30th April 
Grey Trout, Lake Trout or Lunge from 15th Oct. to ist Dec. 
Ouananiche do do from 15th Sept. to ist Dec. 

Whitefish do do from loth Nov. to ist Dec. 

Note — Both days inclusive in each case. 




SCENE ABOVE EI<I<ARD'S. 



CLOSE SEASON FOR GAME. 

Caribou _ . _ from ist February to ist September 

Deer and Moose - from ist January to ist October 
Beaver - - - at any time of the year up to the ist 

November, 1900. 
Mink, Otter, Marten, Pekan, Fox or Lynx 

from 1st April to ist November 
Hare - - - - from ist February to ist November 
Muskrat _ . _ from ist May to ist January 
Woodcock, Snipe, Plover, Curlew, Tatler or Sandpiper 

from 1st February to ist September 
Partridge of any kind from ist February to 15th September 

Widgeon, Teal or Wild Duck of any kind 

from 1st March to ist September 

And at any time of the year between one hour after sunset 
and one hour before sunrise, in any manner whatever, any 
Woodcock, Snipe or Partridge. 

Moose and Red Deer being specially numerous the number 
of Game Constables has been increased All information about 
license permits can be obtained from N. K. Cormier, (reneral 
Superintendent Forests and Game, Aylmer,Que., or at Room 
31, Central Chambers, Ottawa, Out. 

8 



Extract from letter to " Forest and Stream," of New York, fiom 
J4. Z. Joncas, General Superintendent of Game and Fisheries 
for the Province of Quebec. 

Quebec Game and Tisb territories. 

Department of Lands, Forksts and Fisheries, 
Quebec. March nth. 

Editor Forest and Stream : 

Several of your fellow countrymen, who are no doubt desir- 
ous of acquiring exclusive hunting and fishing rights in this 
Province over certain sections which our laws allow the Gov- 
ernment to lease out, after having previously erected them into 
hunting and fishing territories, frequently write me for informa- 
tion. 

I hope you will allow me to make use of your paper to 
answer their questions, as it is read throughout the United 
States by all sportsmen, and by publishing my answers you will 
convey information not only to those who write directly to us, 
but also to all to whom the same may be of interest. 

I will be as brief, as concise and as clear as possible, answer- 
ing each question put to me. 

1. To whom must applications for leasing a hunting terri- 
tory, a salmon river or any lake be sent ? 

Always to the Commissioner of Lands, Forests and Fisher- 
ies, at Quebec. 

2. On what conditions can leases be effected ? 

The conditions vary, according to the extent of territory, its 
proximity to means of communication, and the intrinsic value 
of the territory whose lease is applied for. 

3. In what parts of the Province are the best lakes for fish- 
ing and the best salmon rivers ? 

The best salmon rivers are those of the Gaspe Peninsula 
and Labrador, which flow into the St. Lawrence on the north 
and south. There are also some which flow into the Saguenay. 
All these rivers are well known to American fishermen. 

The best lakes for fishing are those in the Counties of Ottawa 
and Pontiac. They contain an abundance of speckled trout 
(^Sal?nofontin-alis), gray trout {Sa/mo conjinis), touladi, bass, etc. 



9 



4. In what parts of the Province of Quebec are the best 
hunting territories situated ? 

In Labrador, the Counties of Ottawa and Pontiac, where 
there are numbers of moose, caribou, red deer and smaller 
game. Moose and red deer are found in abundance, especially 
in the Counties of Pontiac and Ottawa. 



5. Can the lessee of a hunting or fishing territory invite his 
friends to come and hunt or fish with him without their being 
compelled to take out a permit or pay for a license ? 

Undoubtedly. For all hunting and fishing purposes during 
the open season the lessee is master of his own territory, and 
may invite whomsoever he pleases to share his pleasures and 
amusements without his guests ha\dng to pay for licenses, 
whether they do or do not reside in the Province. 

6. What rights are conferred by the lease ? 

The lease gives the lessee the exclusive right to fish and 
hunt in the territory leased to him during the open season. 

7. What extent of territory can be leased for hunting pur- 
poses ? 

A hunting section cannot be greater than 400 square miles, 
but there is nothing to prevent any individual, company or club 
from leasing several sections. Sections of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 100, 
200 or 300 square miles can also be leased. 




BLUE SEA I^AKE. 




10 



8. What is the cost per square mile of hunting territories ? 

Everything depends on the location of the land selected, 
but it cannot be less than per square mile. If the territory 
contains a considerable number of large game, such as moose, 
caribou and red deer, and if it is easy of access, as much as $io 
per square mile may be charged. The territories most easy of 
access are those along the the Pontiac Pacific Junction and 
the Ottawa and Gatineau Railways. 

The Pontiac and Ottawa & Gatineau Railways run through 
territories containing considerable numbers of large game. 

Of course, in a letter like this I am compelled to restrict 
myself to general information, but I will always be at the dis- 
posal of those who may wish for more details. Moreover, I will 
in a future letter revert to this special and very important 
subject. 

9. For how long are the leases ? 

They cannot be for less than two nor for more than ten 
years. 

10. When, where and to whom are the rents paid? 

The rent is paid on signing the lease, and every year after- 
ward at the same date, at Quebec, to the Commissioner of 
Lands, Forests and Fisheries. 

11. Can the lease be transferred ? 

The lessee may sublet, sell his rights or transfer his lease ; 
but such transfer or sale is subject to the approval of the Gov- 
ernment. 

12. Have lessees the privilege of cutting timber needed for 
building their houses, for fuel, etc., on lands belonging to the 
Crown ? 

Yes. 

13. Have lessees the right to take to the United States the 
game killed or fish caught by them. 

Beyond a doubt, provided the hunting and fishing have 
been within the open season. 

Permits and information may be obtained through Mr. N. 
B. Cormier, Gen. Supt., F. F. G. K. & F. O., Aylmer, Que.; 
also through the O. & G. Ry., 31 Central Chambers, Ottawa, 
Ont. 



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Prtnctpal l)Otel$ in Ottawa. 

««« 

F. X. ST. JACQUES, - Proprietor 

Ths Gilmour 

FREEMAN I. DANIELS, Proprietor 

Orand Union i 

HUGH ALEXANDER, - Proprietor 

\ 

HotsI Oeoil 

E 

C. H. GENSLINGER, - Proprietor 

Butler HoLJSO ^ 

THOMAS BUTLER - Proprietor ^ 

NA/indsor House 

1: 

LESLIE & CO., - Proprietors 

Tlno BrLjnswiok: 

JOHN HUCKELL, - Proprietor 

%^ 




Ottawa and 6atineau Railway. 

HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSES CONVENIENT TO STATIONS. 



Stations. 



CheIvSEa . . . 



HOTEI.S. 


Proprietors. 


1 Per Week 


0. & G. House. . 


C. McCloskey 


3 GO to 3 50 


Royal 


T. Moore 


3 50 to 4 00 


Peerless 


Sam, Dunn, . . 


3 50 




E. Vincent . . . 


3 50 



Cascades 

Kirk's Ferry 

Wakefield 

N. Wakefield. 
Farrellton . . 

Low I 

Venosta 

Kazubazua . . I 

Aywin ..... I 

Gracefield . I 
BI.UE Sea Lake 



Hillsden 
Cowden . 



Wakefield 
Riverside 



Boarding Houses 



Moore's 

McCaffrey's .... 

Brook's 

Boarding Houses 

Haveron's 



J. Hillsden . . . 

J. Cowden . . . 

Mrs. Johnstone 
Geo. Thomas , 
Mrs, Malone. . 

Mrs. Cote 

Mrs, Morrison 

W, Moore 

Mrs, McCaffr'y 

G, Brooks .... 

J. Smith 

Matt. Brooks , 

!D, Haveron, . . 



Iroquois jMcGinn&Ab't 

Kazubazua iT, Marks . . . 



vStage 

Temperance . 



B. N. Reid . 
J, Stanger . . 



Pickanock |J. Ellard . . . 

Victoria |P. D. Boyer 

St, Jacques St. Jacques 

iRowan's Rowan Bros, 



3 50 
3 00 

3 50 

4 CO 



3 50 

3 00 

3 00 
3 00 
3 00 

3 50 

00 to 4 GO 

4 GO 

OG to 4 GG 
GG to 4 GG 

5 . 00 
3 00 

3 00 

4 GG 




BI,UE SEA I.AKE. 
23 



PURE MOUNTAIN AIR 

, BEST B^ss 



J 




HJ.BEEMER. P.W.RESSEMAN 

Fresicfenf. Genera/Supi, 

Ottawa.Ontj